Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Wild Rabbits Grazing - A Meditation



Wild Rabbits Grazing -  A Meditation

Appalachian Cottontail Rabbits, a rare variety of New England Cottontails become more social in the early Fall and can be found feeding together in the morning. This is what happens when you keep a wild yard, not only is it low on maintenance it is more inviting to wildlife. More on this later. A little background on this rabbit from WIKI:

The Appalachian cottontail (Sylvilagus obscurus) is a species of cottontail rabbit in the family Leporidae. It is a rare species found in the upland areas of the eastern United States. The species was only recognized as separate from the New England cottontail (Sylvilagus transitionalis) in 1992.

The Appalachian cottontail, Sylvilagus obscurus, is a small rabbit inhabiting mostly mountainous regions in the eastern U.S. ranging from Pennsylvania to South Carolina and being most prominent in the Appalachians.[2] S. obscurus is better adapted to colder climates than its distant relative, S. floridanus, the eastern cottontail. S. obscurus is light-yellow brown, mixed with black on the dorsal side, having a brown and red patch mixed on the neck. The ventral side is mostly white.[3] The Appalachian cottontail and S. transitionalis, the New England cottontail, are not easily distinguished in the field, and are most easily identified geographically. Cottontails found south or west of the Hudson River are considered Appalachian cottontails, those found north and east are considered New England cottontails. The species can otherwise be identified by chromosome number and skull measurements.[5] Female Appalachian cottontails are typically larger than males with reproductive needs being the most likely cause. The weight of the Appalachian Cottontail can range from as little as 756 grams (1.667 lb) up to as much as 1,153 grams (2.542 lb). The average length is 408 mm (16.1 in). The lifespan of S. obscurus is rather short, less than a year in some cases.
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Wild Rabbits Grazing -  A Meditation




Wild Rabbits Grazing -  A Meditation




Monday, October 16, 2017

American Robins Feasting on Devil's Walking Stick Berries



American Robins Feasting on Berries

Robins, Grosbeaks, Cardinals, Juncos and various other songbirds partake of an early autumn feast of ripe Walking Stick berries!
Aralia spinosa, commonly known as devil's walkingstick, is a woody species of plants in the genus Aralia, family Araliaceae, native to eastern North America. The various names refer to the viciously sharp, spiny stems, petioles, and even leaf midribs. It has also been known as Angelica-tree.[1]
This species is sometimes called Hercules' clubprickly ash, or prickly elder, common names it shares with the unrelated Zanthoxylum clava-herculis. For this reason, Aralia spinosa is sometimes confused with that species and mistakenly called the Toothache Tree,[2] but it does not have the medicinal properties of Zanthoxylum clava-herculis.
Aralia spinosa is occasionally cultivated for its exotic, tropical appearance, having large lacy compound leaves. It is closely related to the Asian species Aralia elata, a more commonly cultivated species with which it is easily confused.
Aralia spinosa is widespread in the eastern United States, ranging from New York to Florida along the Atlantic coast, and westward to OhioIllinois, and Texas. It prefers a deep moist soil.[1] The plants typically grow in the forest Understory or at the edges of forests, often forming clonal thickets by sprouting from the roots.
This tree was admired by the Iroquois because of its usefulness, and for its rarity. The Iroquois would take the saplings of the tree and plant them near their villages and on islands, so that animals wouldn't eat the valuable fruit. The fruit was used in many of the natives' foods. The women would take the flowers and put them in their hair because of the lemony smell. The flowers could also be traded for money.
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American Robins Feasting on Devil's Walking Stick Berries


American Robins Feasting on Berries

Abandoned Cabin Great Smoky Mountains


Abandoned Cabin Great Smoky Mountains

Abandoned cabin from the early part of the 20th century found on an off-trail expedition on the North Carolina Mountain to Seas Trail in the Plott Balsams. At an elevation of 5,500 feet this was likely a loggers cabin that probably became a hunting cabin. Judging by the age of the non-pop top beer cans and lack of any newer evidence this cabin was likely last used sometime in the late 50's or 60's. A nice little spring was nearby and the only sign of life was a cute little White Spotted Slimy Salamander under some debris that we carefully left alone.
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Abandoned Cabin Great Smoky Mountains

Abandoned Cabin Great Smoky Mountains

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Orphaned Baby Squirrels Rescued - A Documentary


Orphaned Baby Squirrels Rescued -  A Documentary

Mother Squirrel is missing and her two precious baby kittens have climbed to the nest box entrance and were calling desperately for their Mom. I was watching them in person and on a nest box camera so now it was time to rescue the little ones and take them to a wildlife rehab center I had coordinated with in advance. This is their story.
Mother Squirrels are some of the most dedicated in the animal kingdom and squirrels have very strong family bonds, you can sense the bigger older brother concern for and care of his smaller younger sibling. You can see momma squirrel in happier times with her two kittens in the nest box at: https://youtu.be/iYFc7gX1JXw
This story is a remix of these two videos into one so the whole story is told - many people were bummed out by watching the first part and missed the second part.
Baby Squirrels Calling Missing Mom:
https://youtu.be/c94dkCwlUUI
Orphaned Baby Squirrels Rescued:
https://youtu.be/7VFPhhMObTc
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Orphaned Baby Squirrels Rescued

Orphaned Baby Squirrels Rescued -  A Documentary




Orphaned Baby Squirrels Rescued -  A Documentary




Saturday, October 14, 2017

Happy Llama Eating Up Close



Happy Llama Eating Up Close

Llamas eating up close can't help but be entertaining. This pack Llama is happily eating its lunch after carrying supplies up to the lodge at the top of Mt LeConte in the Great Smoky Mountains (6593').
A video of the entire Llama Train is at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6CQKJ8VJos&t=104s New HD videos uploaded frequently. Subscribe at:
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More info at:
http://screech-owls.blogspot.com/

Happy Llama Eating Up Close



Happy Llama Eating Up Close


American Oil Beetles - Poisonous Blister Beetles



American Oil Beetles - Poisonous Blister Beetles

Do not ever touch these beetles! Bizarre bugs indeed! I happened upon about a dozen of these beauties in a fall mating frenzy centered around two very large females full of eggs. Fortunately I did not step on them in the middle of the trail. They are called Blister Beetles because they emit an oil that will burn the skin if you pick them up. The poison they contain is among the strongest known. Cantharidin is an odorless, colorless fatty substance of the terpenoid class, which is secreted by many species of blister beetles. It is a burn agent or a poison in large doses, but preparations containing it were historically used as aphrodisiacs. In its natural form, cantharidin is secreted by the male blister beetle and given to the female as a copulatory gift during mating. Afterwards, the female beetle covers her eggs with it as a defense against predators.
Poisoning from cantharidin is a significant veterinary concern, especially in horses, but it can also be poisonous to humans if taken internally (where the source is usually experimental self-exposure). Externally, cantharidin is a potent vesicant (blistering agent), exposure to which can cause severe chemical burns. Properly dosed and applied, the same properties have also been used therapeutically, for instance for treatment of skin conditions such as molluscum contagiosum infection of the skin.
Cantharidin is classified as an extremely hazardous substance in the United States, and is subject to strict reporting requirements by facilities which produce, store, or use it in significant quantities. This excerpt is from a great Blog post on these beetles at:
https://thesmallermajority.com/2012/1...
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American Oil Beetles - Poisonous Blister Beetles




American Oil Beetles - Poisonous Blister Beetles

Friday, October 13, 2017

A Most Perfect Chipmunk Video



A Most Perfect Chipmunk Video

Chipmunk takes on a cup of sunflower seeds on a perfect Fall morning. While we admire the changing leaves he is thinking ahead to winter!
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Squirrel Condos are a lot of fun.....

A Most Perfect Chipmunk Video

A Most Perfect Chipmunk Video


Thursday, October 12, 2017

Bear Thinks Its a Hummingbird



Bear Thinks Its a Hummingbird

Meet the HummingBear - a 200 pound bear that delicately licks the nectar from a fragile hummingbird feeder so it is not damaged and can be filled again and then quietly moves on. Because the bear can't flap its arms fast enough to fly it has to sit on the deck railing and stretch out its rather huge tongue to drink nectar.

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Bear Thinks Its a Hummingbird

Bear Thinks Its a Hummingbird

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Llama Train Mt Leconte Great Smoky Mountains National Park



Llama Train Mt Leconte Great Smoky Mountains National Park

The arrival of the Llama Train at the Mt Leconte Lodge in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park is quite an experience. Hiked up to the top of Mt Leconte at 6,593 feet in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park just in time to see the arrival of the Llama Train which because there are no roads brings supplies up and down the mountain to the Mt Leconte Lodge at the top. Llamas are a blast to watch. I'll post a video on the hike up soon.
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Llama Train Mt Leconte Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Llama Train Mt Leconte Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Monday, October 9, 2017

COMICA Micro Compact Video Microphone Review



COMICA Micro Compact Video Microphone Review



Audio is just as important as video in filming Nature or VLOG production. A review of the COMICA Micro Compact Directional Condenser Shotgun Video Microphone (CVM-VM10II) for Smartphones and DSLR camera's reveals a significant improvement over the stock internal microphones. Small, lightweight but strong, requiring no extra batteries, excellent foam and wind covers, easy to use and carry all day on the camera this microphone will improve the quality of my videos at a very affordable price.
A link to this microphone on Amazon is:
http://amzn.to/2g5Je4N




COMICA Micro Compact Video Microphone

COMICA Micro Compact Video Microphone Review

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Comica CVM-VM10II Full Metal Compact On Camera Cardioid Directional Mini Shotgun Video Microphone for Smartphone iPhone,HuaWei,DJI Osmo,SonyA9/A7RII/A7RSII,GH4/ GH5, and DSLR Camera